ALAN .S. JEEVES

A WINTER'S TRILL

 

Sing me a song to help me along,

Pay me a visit on this chilly day;

Warble your words profoundly and strong

I will listen intently to all that you say.

 

Play me a tune, just before noon,

Whistle a melody heartfelt and sweet;

Make yourself heard, quaver and croon,

Sing your cantata entire and complete.

 

Call to your mate o'er there by the gate,

Carry your voice through the crisp brumal frost;

Perform your duet afore it's too late....

Before the daylight is forfeit and lost.

 

Chirp a refrain and thrill me again

In a way only robins can tranquilly do;

Hop from your branch and dance in the rain

Trill me a winterly chorus or two.

 

Sing your song bright as you take off in flight,

Allow, now, your voice fill the cool dusky skies;

Flit away home as the day turns to night

But come back again, next day, at sun rise.

 

                            ASJ

 

 

 

Comments6

  • Unsub

    Alan,

    a stunning crispy, cold & nature filled poem.

    I always ensure i leave out bread & fill up the nut holders for the friends in the garden.

    Last year I even hand fed a fox which I befriended over about three weeks as he entered my garden.

    He came back in August after a 7 month break. Haven't seen him since October but he no doubt travels long distances. Hope to see him again soon.

    Enjoyed the poem; winter has arrived!

    Unsub.

    • ALAN .S. JEEVES

      Good day Dan. Thought I'd better post something a bit brighter today. Robins usually stay with us through the winter. I got up close to one last week. He had just received his new winter waistcoat (in garnet red) and wanted to show it off ~ don't blame him.

      Ex animo, Alan

    • orchidee

      A lovely write Alan.

      • ALAN .S. JEEVES

        Hi Steve. "When the red, red robin comes bob, bob, bobin' along..................................................."

        Kind regards, Alan

        • orchidee

          Oohh, a burst into song from you! Is your singing torture, as mine is - well, so they say! heehee.

        • dusk arising

          So easy to take our cohabitant wildlife for granted but there comes a time when we do begin to appreciate this beautiful world and all its life forms. This reads like words from an enlightened soul enjoying feathered friends.

          • ALAN .S. JEEVES

            'If you talk to animals they will talk with you and you will know each other. If you do not talk with them you will not know them and what you do not know you will fear ~ what one fears one destroys'.........Chief Dan George

            Kind regards, Alan

          • Fay Slimm

            Ah - I have been doing just that this afternoon Alan - conversing with robin as I dug up the weeds - he has such a tameness and comes close to my spade - - thanks for this wonderful ode to the songbirds all over this island.

            • ALAN .S. JEEVES

              Hello Fay. Good to know you have a rusty coloured friend. Robins enjoy our gardens so much that they do not (as a rule) fly to warmer climes for the winter ~ unlike humans!

              Regards and thanks as always,
              Ex animo, Alan

            • Bragee

              I enjoyed this peice of art very much. The pleasant feel of nature!

              • ALAN .S. JEEVES

                Hello Bragee. Glad you enjoyed this poem, which was actually penned by a robin. He never learned to read and write (didn't need to) so I stole it from him as he slept.

                Kind regards, Alan and Red Robbo

              • Goldfinch60

                The robin is one of the most beautiful birds. Its song is the first one we hear in the morning and the last one at night.
                A friend of mine did have a robin who tapped on his window if the mealworms had all gone!

                Andy

                • ALAN .S. JEEVES

                  Hi Andy. Listen to Joan Baez 'Diamonds and Rust' (1975), a song she wrote about one of her former boyfriends. In it she says his eyes are/were 'bluer than robins eggs' (a very nice line, thought I). I couldn't figure this out because, as everyone knows, robins eggs are brown. I thought it was just poetic license.
                  Then one day I discovered that there was a European robin (brown eggs) and N. American robin (deep blue eggs). Music can teach us so much.

                  Ex animo, alan



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