tundrol

Control your ass

There is hardly a breeze. The February sun

Stretches forth long fingers, and begins the slow thaw

Of our deep-frozen bones, so that things new begun

Will, in the coming year, ripen, grow and mature.

The church bells chime the hour, tediously questioning

Our good use of the time, mocking our intentions,

As though we could never succeed in fashioning

Anything that endures, despite our pretensions.

And night comes slowly on, the light in the West dims

As the sun disappears below the horizon.

The moon rises between two great clouds in the East.

Stars come out one by one. An ass, sad lowly beast,

Complains loud to the sky that his rations are gone,

And I feel his dull pain in all my aching limbs.

 

 

Comments3

  • ANGELA & BRIAN

    Bon Nuit TUNDROL - Merci pour une Poeme tres elegante et plien de Rhyme et Rhythm ! Thanks for a very intersting story regarding the noises & nature of the Asses (Animals not Derrieres !) on the pilgrimage Route to St Jaques de Compostelle. We still has Donkeys (Asses) on the Beaches in Essex and if overridden by Kids who provoke them they do produce that extraordinary and unnatural He-Haw-He-Haw-He-Haw sound you mention. There are many words in English / American which have an Double Entendre ! Examples are Prick - Cock - Brush - Tit etc. They are often a source of written & spoken Humour - as you have indicated !

    Thanks for sharing ~ Peace & Joy to YOU & YOURS
    Love ANGELA & BRIAN 🧡🤍💙🤍🧡

    • orchidee

      Eek, too much information (TMI) there, A&B. I don't mean the length of the comment, but what's in it. (oops).

      • tundrol

        Thanks, Angela and Brian. In fact, the pun only works in American English since the word is 'arse' in English English. By the way, keep on speaking French like that because French women adore it, mistakes and all.

      • Barry Hodges

        I would suggest respectfully to Angela and Brian that, before attempting to write in a foreign language, they should try and have a better command of it. Otherwise they risk becoming ridiculous.

        What you should have written was "Bonsoir Tundrol, - Merci pour un poème très élégant et agréable, plein de rimes et de rythme." That's NINE to TWELVE errors in as many words. Bravo.

        • tundrol

          That's a bit hard, Barry. As I mentioned to Angela and Brian, French women adore French spoken badly by an Englishman. It's so chic! It's a bit the same for English men listening to a French woman. No? Anyway, if you don't practice, bad as you might be, you're never going to get any better.

          • Barry Hodges

            There's a difference between spoken language and written language. I might enjoy hearing a Frenchwoman speaking English with a strong accent, especially if she looked like Bardot's even prettier and much sexier and younger sister, but I wouldn't be so impressed if she wrote a letter saying "Ellau Barri I seenk you av a lervli berdy an I werd lerv you too maik lerv weez moi". And surely getting virtually every word wrong suggests you can't even use le magnifique Monsieur Google!

          • 2 more comments

          • orchidee

            I got enough trouble with 'façade', except it's put in that accent thing under the 'c' for me. How to get those accents in, if we're gonna speak French?!

            • tundrol

              Get a French keyboard? Translate your text with Google? Use Insert Special Character in Open Office. There are certainly other ways, the best way will depend on the frequency with which you want to use 'em.



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