Kevin Michael Bloor

Love Birds

 

From '56 to '71,
I was a songbird's only son:
a wistful, melancholic fellow,

a fledgling, with his wings dyed yellow.


From '72 to '77, I lived on love,
with dove from heaven.
I'd found her in a field of heather;
she'd fell from sky like falcon's feather.

From '78 to '83, since bird had flown,
they set me free:
to soar and swoop from mountainside,
until my wings were clipped and tied.

From '84 to '99, with ball and chain
was damned to dine.
For hatchlings, I would serve my time;
they were the reason and the rhyme!

2000 foretold kinder fate:
8 years until 2008!
That golden year of jubilee,
when long-lost dove flew home to me.

2009 to present day, brings twilight years
to passion play, and yes,
this final storm we'll weather,
two love birds, growing old together.

 

 

Comments4

  • Fay Slimm.

    Loud applause Kevin for this greatly inventive Love-Bird rhyming .

    • Kevin Michael Bloor

      Many thanks, Fay. This poem was inspired by Maysfield's epic, the everlasting mercy. Glad you liked.

    • Laura

      Kevin,

      You’ve masterfully encapsulated the trials and tribulations of two love birds who shall ‘weather’ their ‘final storm growing old together’...
      enriched with passion
      and love.

      Laura🌻

      • Kevin Michael Bloor

        Thank you, Laura, for your kind and generous feedback. 😉

      • Goldfinch60

        Wonderful write Kevin, that love has come home and you will fly together forever.

        Andy

      • L. B. Mek

        majestic in its sincerity and unvarnished transparency, such lived-in words can only be voiced from one who's observant eyes remained wide, in those crucial moments of life - most blink and let us pass-by,
        a beautiful tale of hope's reward for those armed with unfailing faith,
        liked the relaxed style and timeline details to help anchor the flow and rhythm of your stanzas
        wonderful, thanks for sharing

        • Kevin Michael Bloor

          Many thanks, L.B. for your very kind and generous comments and feedback. I was inspired by Masefield's poem, the everlasting mercy. Check it out. It's a thousand times better than my poor little poem. 😉



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