Trenz Pruca

Moses was a strange man

 

Moses was a strange man.
He lost his way
in the desert
for forty years.
He told his people
they were better off
in the desert
for forty years
than in Egypt
where they had running
water and food.

 

There was no food
in the desert.
Moses did not
know how to farm
so, God had to
feed his people.

 

Moses told his people,
he would lead them
out of the desert
to a land where
people had milk
and honey.
He said they should
kill those people,
take their land,
drink their milk
eat their honey.

 

When some of his people thought
another God
might get them out
of the desert
sooner,
he killed them.

 

Moses brought God's law
to his people.
One law said
"Thou shalt not kill.”.

Comments5

  • dusk arising

    Christianity is full of dual standards. Once realised and one's questions start to nag one's brain, then christianity can be seen for what it was designed for by some clever men back then when the world was flat...... as a power base... based upon fear..... to control people.
    It's a rather well designed religion because many people are still sucked in as children and afraid to address the dual standards and glaring contradictions such as you identify, but there are many others.
    Along the way christianity has tried to drag its heels into reality, for example - 300 years after Galilieo proved the earth was round the christian church lifted the title of 'Heretic' from his name for disagreeing with their 'flat world' stories. Of course there are many more contradictions and shameful facts about christianity such as it's support of slavery for around 300 years and its providing hiding places for peadophiles.

    Accepting that christianity is a farce does NOT mean one is rejecting God. It means you are rejecting the falseness of the way christianity claims to be God's way.

    A clear message in your piece today which may lead some to begin asking themselves questions about falseness in christian teaching, belief and practice. Into my favourites.

  • blue orchid

    christianity gives us,and by us i mean myself and my brothers and sisters in christ,something to believe in,eventhough we can't see it,that's faith,something to holdi onto,something worth living and dying for,something so massive that we don't understand that we fall down at christs feet and weep for he cleanses our souls and washes away our sins and set's our hearts free.moses had went 40 years in the wilderness to punish the people who disobeyed god.He is the father of the world and punishes the disobedient,just like most earthly fathers would because they love us".for god so loved the world he gave his only begotten son,so that whosoever believeth in him shall not parish but have everlasting life"" john 3:16 Christianityi is alive and thriving. kindest regards melissa crown

  • Goldfinch60

    There is a challenge to "Thou must not kill" the actual translation is "Thou shalt not murder" which gives a completely different view on the commandment.

    Andy

  • L. B. Mek

    2020 and we still look down at those pigeons with their miniscule brain sizes: as they soar above us..
    then look up at the majesty of our chosen Deity's and judge their entity in comparison to our fallible likeness'...
    or seat back, armed with the foresight of history's hindsight from the samples of hand-me-down literature that we so easily accept as fact, judging with our perfectly blinkered eyesight's that so clearly detail the shortcoming in other's, while barely glimpsing at a mirror for more than a minute - for fear of the truth's it could reveal...
    amazing to think of the amount of land on earth that still remains unclaimed and barren, while we elbow and nudge our way through life in our clusters of conformity, ensuing the unending continuation of conflict - derived purely from the fact that we cant give each other a modicum of space: even here in this untameable magnitude we so tellingly titled the world wide 'web'

  • Lorna

    Oh this made me laugh so hard........ best to analyze too deeply all those old stories eh?



To be able to comment and rate this poem, you must be registered. Register here or if you are already registered, login here.