Michael Edwards

COCKNEY RHYMING SLANG IS SPOKE

 

 

COCKNEY RHYMING SLANG IS SPOKE

 

 

Cockney rhyming slang is spoke

By any proper cockney bloke

It really is a load of cobblers

If you think it’s spoke by scholars.

 

 

Cobblers awls;

load of balls,

testicles.

 

 

Comments7

  • Goldfinch60

    Lor' luv a duck! I often get mistaken fer a cockney as da place in Ken' where I spen' da first Bullseye years ov me life used ter 'ave Eastenders come down durin' da 'op pickin' season an' many stayed so there is an area in da Medway towns what sounds like East London. Know what I mean?

    • Michael Edwards

      Gotcher mate - we ain't doin so bad - but wot appens when we're brown bread?

      • Goldfinch60

        In that case the those whom we left behind might be saddened by our demise, but in due course they would come to terms with it. We would be looking down upon their sorrow drinking their health with the excellent vintage wine of choice.

      • orchidee

        I gave up watching EastEnders after the first episode - well, almost! Oh lol, fine write M.

        • Michael Edwards

          The East End doesn't exist any more along with true cockneys. I often travel from Stratford into central London by bus and I am almost invariably the only white face on board. I am not being racist here, far from it, but merely observing the changing demographics of the area within the sound of Bow Bells.

          • orchidee

            I wish EastEnders didn't exist anymore!

          • 2 more comments

          • dusk arising

            Well me old china (plate - mate), just along the frog (and toad -road) where they sort me barnet (fair - hair) if ya kick off yer daiseys (daisey roots - booots) - so long as it aint too harry (harry and billy - chilly) theres a rub-a-dub (pub) where youll end up brahms (brahms and liszt - pissed) for less than a pony (£25).
            OK cock?

            • Michael Edwards

              Yus okay me old mucker - well I am now. Crawled out of Uncle Ned this morning, had a good raspberry, went for a Jimmy, washed me bushel and boat race, brushed me Hampsteads, put on me Dicky and me round the houses, went down the apples and made a Rosie for the trouble and strife. Then put on the computer and what a load of pony - must write something more serious.

            • Lorna

              Bloody 'ell - is it really dying? It has to wait till I see it!

              • Michael Edwards

                Well sort of but it remains as an oddity having been adopted by the tongue in cheek brigade across the country.

              • BRIAN & ANGELA

                WELL WHO'D ave fought it ! Me old CHINA (plate = mate) MIKE usin the Cockney Rhymin Slang ~ an im in his bessie WHISTLE (an flute = suit) wiv a smile on is BOAT (race = face) an avin a BUBBLE (baff = laff) in the BATTLE (cruiser = boozer) ! I love CRS and we hear a lot of it in ESSEX cos we're near the SMOKE (London) ! What bamboozles Foreigners is that we don't use the RHYMING WORD but the other one ! Thus ALANS = KNICKERS from ALAN WHICKERS ! I have friends and colleagues who often slip in a word in CRS so I need a few words ! Thanks ~ Yer ole CHINA ~ BRIAN PS ~ You forgot to post the LONDON PRIDE picture !

              • FineB

                Thank you Matey. A great poem.

                Keep writing
                FineB

              • Laura

                Michael,
                A most entertaining write!
                I had fun reading it!
                Imagine...if you can...
                an Italian-American trying
                to read all of that! 🤣

                I did enjoy trying to! My husband was hysterical!

                A beautiful picture! A London pride indeed!

                ~Laura~

                • Michael Edwards

                  Thanks Laura - so pleased it gave you both a chuckle - I was brought up with it in north London and could hold whole conversations - nowadays in the East End the common language is a cross between imported accents - a far cry from cockney.



                To be able to comment and rate this poem, you must be registered. Register here or if you are already registered, login here.